IKM Architects’ Managing Principal Architect, John Schrott, AIA, ACHA, Achieves EDAC Accreditation

IKM Architects’ Managing Principal Architect, John Schrott, AIA, ACHA, Achieves EDAC Accreditation

March 2015 – IKM Architects, a Pittsburgh-Based architecture, planning and interior design firm is proud to announce the continued pursuit of innovative and informed architecture with the achievement of EDAC accreditation for its managing principal, John C. Schrott, AIA, ACHA, EDAC.

EDAC stands for Evidence-based Design Accreditation and Certification. EDAC-certified individuals are a global community of forward-thinking professionals helping achieve EDAC’s vision of a world where all healthcare environments reflect design using an evidence-based process.


“…this addition of Evidence-based Design Accreditation and Certification (EDAC) for John confirms that they are the most appropriate choice for our ongoing healthcare design projects.”

 – Albert Wright, President of WVUHealthcare


IKM client, Albert Wright, President of West Virginia University Healthcare said, “We knew the IKM team, and specifically John Schrott, had the healthcare design credentials that set them apart from the competition, this addition of Evidence-based Design Accreditation and Certification (EDAC) for John confirms that they are the most appropriate choice for our ongoing healthcare design projects.”

Schrott added, “I have long been a proponent of Evidence-Based Design, this credentialing provides the evidence that we practice what we preach.” Schrott has been a member of the American College of Healthcare Architects, an elite group of certified healthcare architects for 14 years. He is currently overseeing the $250 million expansion at West Virginia University Healthcare including a 10-story bed tower addition, expanded emergency department, roadway relocation, new entrance and atrium and renovations of existing hospital space.

EDAC validates the steps that IKM utilizes during the design process. On all of our healthcare projects, including our work at West Virginia University Healthcare, we make informed decisions that positively impact healing. Our designs incorporate evidence-based principles such as celebrated access to day light that reduces the need for pain medication; close proximity to a caregiver that reduces patient falls and increases staff interaction times; and supporting family engagement that reduces length of stay and increases patient satisfaction scores.1

According to The Center for Healthcare Design website, evidence-based design (EBD) is the process of basing decisions about the built environment on credible research to achieve the best possible outcomes. The Center for Health Design created the evidence-based design accreditation and certification, EDAC, program to establish a definition and process for incorporating EBD into design. Today, EDAC is an internationally recognized program that awards certification to individuals who demonstrate an understanding of the application of EBD in the design, construction, renovation, expansion, and replacement of healthcare facilities.

“It has been documented that the healthcare consumer experience is significantly impacted by the built environment. Using scientifically validated research is a key factor in creating spaces that promote positive experiences and efficient process flows helping the industry deliver better care at lower costs,” said Schrott